"Capsicum is also known as sweet peppers (green, red, or yellow peppers), are mild flavored and used as vegetables."bell_peppers
1.   Capsicum improves digestion by increasing stomach secretions.

2.   It increases metabolism to burn a measurable number of calories at a higher rate.

3.   Capsicum reduces high blood pressure, protects against some types of cancer and is useful in the treatment of chronic rhinitis.

4.   Capsicum has been used in folk remedies to treat everything from impotence to liver disease. Loaded with vitamins A, C and beta carotene, peppers are naturally low in fat, calories and cholesterol.

5.   Capsicum acts on and desensitizes nerve fibers that carry pain signals throughout the nervous system.

Capsicum is ideal for diabetic patients. If the diabetic diet was supposed to be boring, try spicing up your cuisine with capsicum-based products, like hot sauce or jalapeno peppers.
This is an important finding for dieters.
If you sprinkle cayenne pepper flakes on your low-fat pizza or soup, toss some sliced jalapeno peppers into your salad, or chop some habanero peppers into your turkey chili, you may be able to lose weight faster!

Capsicum Nutritional Analysis (per serve)

Average Quantity per 100g capsicum

Energy    293kJ (70Cal)
Protein    1.4g
Fat, Total    5.9g
Saturated Fat    less than 1g
Carbohydrate    2.6g
Sugars    2.5g
Sodium     less than 5mg
Potassium    129mg
Magnesium    5.9mg
Calcium    5.3mg
Phosphorus    24.4mg
Iron    less than 1mg
Zinc    less than 1mg
Niacin    0.6mg
Niacin    0.8mg
Vitamin C    102mg
Folate    25.5ug
Vitamin A    91.4ug
Retinol    less than 0.01ug
B-Carotene EQ    542ug

Like the primary hues of a flag in Central or South America where they originated, sweet bell peppers fly their colors proudly. Whether red, orange, yellow or green, the brilliant tints of these gleaming fruits are largely responsible for their nutritional
appeal.

The sunniest tones yield the highest concentration of antioxidant carotenoids. One small red, yellow or orange pepper provides three times the recommended daily allowance of vitamin C—way ahead of citrus. Red peppers stand out as one of the few foods that contain lycopene, a carotenoid which lowers the risk of various cancers, including prostate and cervical cancer. These crimson packages are also packed with beta-carotene, converted to vitamin A in the body and essential for night vision. Nature’s best source of zeaxanthin, a compound known to protect against cataracts and macular degeneration, can be found in orange peppers.

Regardless of their exterior, all bell peppers share a healthy dose of fiber, a hallmark of their characteristic crunch, which helps lower cholesterol
and ward off colon cancer. They also offer a wealth of vitamin B6 and folic acid, thought to protect blood vessels from damage by reducing levels of homocysteine in the body. Plentiful A and C vitamins boost immunity and guard against a range of ailments, including heart disease, diabetes, arthritis and risks associated with smoking such as emphysema.
Health Benefits:

- lowers the risk of certain cancers, such as prostate and cervical
- contains high levels of beta-carotene
- high concentration of Vitamin A aids against vision loss
- boosts immunity levels

Christopher Columbus, who “discovered” and named sweet and hot peppers in the New World, recognized their culinary value. Like tomatoes, fresh bell peppers made their way around the globe courtesy of Spanish and Portuguese explorers. In the process, they became an essential component in a vast array of worldly cuisines, from southern Italy to Creole Louisiana to Mexico.  Paprika—made from dried red peppers—remains a ubiquitous seasoning throughout the world. 


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